SOAK UP THE SCENERY Untitled Document

 
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CURRENT MOON

Valuables care  

im-riversong:

Dana Scully + Red

(Source: riverscully)

(Source: extrenious)

Everything in life is just for a while
Philip K. Dick, A Scanner Darkly (via sittingonparkbenches)

neaq:

Visitor Pictures: No fancy DSLR, no problem. Camera phones have been known to capture the beauty of the New England Aquarium just fine—from Leidy’s comb jellies to sea turtles to dwarf seahorses.

untrustyou:

Jonathan Smith - Untold Stories
ghost-b-o-y:


sunset on mars by the spirit rover 2005

do you understand this IS AN ENTIRELY DIFFERENT FUCKING PLANET HOLY SHIT YOUR PROBLEMS DONT MATTER WHEN YOU LOOK AT THIS PICTURE. YOUR PROBLEMS DONT MATTER OUT THERE
cxlcium:

glow blog
hotdoggerms:

i believe 

hqphotojunkie:

Gillian Anderson Malone Photo Shoot

wanttobelieve:

"The X-Files" opening sequence artistically reimaged by reddit user martymcqueen

graviton1066:




 Frozen in Time 






NASA’s Cassini captures a still and partially sunlit Enceladus. The Saturnian moon is covered in ice that reflects sunlight similar to freshly fallen snow, making Enceladus one of the most reflective objects in the solar system. The blue color in this false-color image indicates larger-than-average ice particles. The moon’s surface is decorated with fractures, folds and ridges caused by tectonic stresses.  For more about the tectonics on Enceladus see PIA11686.
This view looks toward the side of Enceladus (313 miles or 504 kilometers across) that faces backward in the moon’s orbit around Saturn. North on Enceladus is up. The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 7, 2010, using filters sensitive to ultraviolet, visible and infrared light (spanning wavelengths from 338 to 750 nanometers).
The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 123,000 miles (198,000 kilometers) from Enceladus. Image scale is 3,889 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.
The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.
For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
Electricity Lightning